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Subject

Retention Email Design from Mention

Strengths

This retention email from Mention.Net is simple and clear. By dividing the email into two spaces they maintain strong hierarchy of the content. The top is a clear call to action to keep your Mention product going. It may be a little long in the text, but the actual content is selling me on the value of their service. The bottom area is relaxed but visually appealing. The typography helps me read in order of importance. The images don’t get in the way. Overall this email serves me the customer well by giving me a sense of what I need to do in order to stay with Mention, and the reasons why they believe I should do so.

Weaknesses

The top area could use a lead in title to quickly explain the reason for the email. This is like saying “Hi, I’m Matthew, and I’d like to explain why you’ll benefit from the Mention Pro Plan”. The top area is over using bold emphasis when a list might have been more helpful and easier to digest. The centered text on the top lacks the necessary padding on the sides to make the text feel more comfortable.
Pixel precision isn’t what I think is important in an email. For instance the line-height (leading) is off on this email, but pointing it out is missing the point. The question is always: Is this email serving the customer and doing its job? Put another way: What would this email hire the customer to do for them?

CategorizedPersonalizedRetention / Reactivation


What data do we know about this email?



How does this look across email clients?

Here’s how Mention's emails render in the most popular email clients. Are yours rendering as designed? Find out with a free trial of Litmus.


How accessible is this email?

Looks aren’t everything. Does this email follow key accessibility best practices? Our friends at Litmus ran the test.

  • Table roles should be clearly defined. This helps screen readers determine how to interpret the table.

  • Larger paragraphs of text should be left-justified to improve readability for some readers.

  • Email headings should be well structured. This will help screen readers easily navigate content.

  • Specifying "alt text" for these images helps screen readers describe the image.

  • Text to voice recording and transcript for hearing impaired.

  • Without a [lang] attribute, screen readers will assume the email is in the default language the subscriber chose when setting up their screen reader. If your email is not in that user’s language, the screen reader may not accurately transcribe your message.

  • Emails should have a "meta content-type" and defined character set.

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